Projects

Two concepts for the Bi-state Reach were developed based largely on input from Workshop 1 (See Concept Plans and Concept Renderings). The resultant concepts were presented to the public in this workshop. Through several small facilitated group discussions, viagra seek the project team received feedback from the public on the direction of the two concepts. Future steps will be to further develop concepts and analyze their benefits. Results of the workshop are available here.
Two concepts for the Bi-state Reach were developed based largely on input from Workshop 1 (See Concept Plans and Concept Renderings). The resultant concepts were presented to the public in this workshop. Through several small facilitated group discussions, viagra seek the project team received feedback from the public on the direction of the two concepts. Future steps will be to further develop concepts and analyze their benefits. Results of the workshop are available here.
The Brush Creek Coordinating Committee (BCCC) is an organized stakeholder group working on realizing the vision that the Brush Creek Basin be “a healthy and sustainable watershed where we respectfully work together to protect, viagra buy healing restore and enhance resources.”  To realize its vision, viagra buy ampoule the BCCC’s mission is “to develop and implement an integrated watershed management plan that manages flooding, prescription improves water quality and balances economic, environmental and social benefits.”

The BCCC has been working closely with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the City of Kansas City, Missouri, and Johnson County, Kansas—sponsors for the Brush Creek Basin Feasibility Study—that will identify opportunities for flood damage reduction, ecosystem restoration and water quality improvements.  Active coordinating committee participants include representatives of the University of Missouri-Kansas City, Region 7 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and local not-for-profit, engineering and water resource experts.  The BCCC’s quarterly meetings provide stakeholders with the opportunity to share information about relevant activities happening within the watershed and to educate stakeholders about the data and information being developed as a part of the Feasibility Study.  The group effectively acts as a steering committee for the work being completed as part of the Feasibility Study.

In 2015, the quarterly meetings of the Brush Creek Coordinating Committee will be held:

Tuesday, February 3;
Tuesday, May 5;
Tuesday, August 4; and
Tuesday, November 3,

8:30 to 10:00 a.m. at the Anita B. Gorman Conservation Discovery Center, 4750 Troost Avenue, Kansas City, MO.

Action Teams

The Brush Creek Coordinating Committee formed four Action teams in 2010 to work on specific areas of interest related to the Feasibility Study and the larger goal of integrated watershed planning for the Brush Creek Basin.  After meeting regularly to establish baselines for their work, the Action Teams meet on an as-needed basis.

  • Communications/Community Engagement Action Team:  Spearheads public outreach and engagement, establishes communications messages and strategy.
  • Project Development Action Team: Supports project design and collaborates with Communications/Community Engagement Action Team is designing community input opportunities.
  • Watershed Management Action Team:  Leads the development of the Brush Creek Watershed Management Plan.
  • Environmental Action Team (E-Team):   Worked with the Corps on development of a habitat restoration model to use in evaluating the economic benefit of potential water quality projects.

Two concepts for the Bi-state Reach were developed based largely on input from Workshop 1 (See Concept Plans and Concept Renderings). The resultant concepts were presented to the public in this workshop. Through several small facilitated group discussions, viagra seek the project team received feedback from the public on the direction of the two concepts. Future steps will be to further develop concepts and analyze their benefits. Results of the workshop are available here.
The Brush Creek Coordinating Committee (BCCC) is an organized stakeholder group working on realizing the vision that the Brush Creek Basin be “a healthy and sustainable watershed where we respectfully work together to protect, viagra buy healing restore and enhance resources.”  To realize its vision, viagra buy ampoule the BCCC’s mission is “to develop and implement an integrated watershed management plan that manages flooding, prescription improves water quality and balances economic, environmental and social benefits.”

The BCCC has been working closely with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the City of Kansas City, Missouri, and Johnson County, Kansas—sponsors for the Brush Creek Basin Feasibility Study—that will identify opportunities for flood damage reduction, ecosystem restoration and water quality improvements.  Active coordinating committee participants include representatives of the University of Missouri-Kansas City, Region 7 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and local not-for-profit, engineering and water resource experts.  The BCCC’s quarterly meetings provide stakeholders with the opportunity to share information about relevant activities happening within the watershed and to educate stakeholders about the data and information being developed as a part of the Feasibility Study.  The group effectively acts as a steering committee for the work being completed as part of the Feasibility Study.

In 2015, the quarterly meetings of the Brush Creek Coordinating Committee will be held:

Tuesday, February 3;
Tuesday, May 5;
Tuesday, August 4; and
Tuesday, November 3,

8:30 to 10:00 a.m. at the Anita B. Gorman Conservation Discovery Center, 4750 Troost Avenue, Kansas City, MO.

Action Teams

The Brush Creek Coordinating Committee formed four Action teams in 2010 to work on specific areas of interest related to the Feasibility Study and the larger goal of integrated watershed planning for the Brush Creek Basin.  After meeting regularly to establish baselines for their work, the Action Teams meet on an as-needed basis.

  • Communications/Community Engagement Action Team:  Spearheads public outreach and engagement, establishes communications messages and strategy.
  • Project Development Action Team: Supports project design and collaborates with Communications/Community Engagement Action Team is designing community input opportunities.
  • Watershed Management Action Team:  Leads the development of the Brush Creek Watershed Management Plan.
  • Environmental Action Team (E-Team):   Worked with the Corps on development of a habitat restoration model to use in evaluating the economic benefit of potential water quality projects.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

This multi-purpose project includes a wide array of ecosystem restoration measures along Brush Creek in the vicinity of Bruce R. Watkins Drive, buy cialis remedy along with compatible flood risk management, thumb recreation considerations, see and water quality improvements. In particular, the hydraulic conditions at the southbound exit ramp bridge will be evaluated to identify flood mitigation related opportunities that may be combined with nearby ecosystem restoration and compatible recreational improvements (e.g. trail connections).

 

LOCATION AND EXTENTS

The project is located along Brush Creek in the vicinity of Bruce R. Watkins Drive in Kansas City, Missouri. It begins between Bruce R. Watkins drive and Prospect Avenue and extends upstream to Woodland Avenue, a stream length of about 2100 feet. Most activities would be located between Swope Parkway and Emanuel Cleaver II Boulevard.

 

BENEFITS TO THE BRUSH CREEK WATERSHED

Habitat:  This ecosystem restoration project would restore aquatic and terrestrial habitat along Brush Creek and support a more diverse variety of species than under existing conditions.

Flood Risk Management:  Management measures could provide increased hydraulic capacity underneath the bridge structures and along the floodplain, landforms to reduce flood extents, and reduce roadway flooding and bridge overtopping frequencies. Additional outcomes would include reducing the potential loss of life, as well as reducing flood damages.

Water Quality:  Ecosystem restoration activities would inherently improve water quality conditions through management measures such as bank stabilization to reduce sedimentation, aquatic/native vegetation, stormwater BMPs, filter strips, bioretention cells, and constructed wetlands.

 

POTENTIAL FEATURES AND/OR ACTIVITIES

  • Channel and floodplain capacity improvements
  • Overflow channels/chutes
  • In-stream habitat structures
  • Bioengineered streambank stabilization
  • Rock riffle/pool complexes
  • Floodplain benches and floodplain connectivity
  • Stormwater outfall treatments
  • Woodland restoration/Prairie restoration
  • Trail connections
  • Stream buffers and filter strips
  • Bioretention cells and constructed wetlands

Two concepts for the Bi-state Reach were developed based largely on input from Workshop 1 (See Concept Plans and Concept Renderings). The resultant concepts were presented to the public in this workshop. Through several small facilitated group discussions, viagra seek the project team received feedback from the public on the direction of the two concepts. Future steps will be to further develop concepts and analyze their benefits. Results of the workshop are available here.
The Brush Creek Coordinating Committee (BCCC) is an organized stakeholder group working on realizing the vision that the Brush Creek Basin be “a healthy and sustainable watershed where we respectfully work together to protect, viagra buy healing restore and enhance resources.”  To realize its vision, viagra buy ampoule the BCCC’s mission is “to develop and implement an integrated watershed management plan that manages flooding, prescription improves water quality and balances economic, environmental and social benefits.”

The BCCC has been working closely with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the City of Kansas City, Missouri, and Johnson County, Kansas—sponsors for the Brush Creek Basin Feasibility Study—that will identify opportunities for flood damage reduction, ecosystem restoration and water quality improvements.  Active coordinating committee participants include representatives of the University of Missouri-Kansas City, Region 7 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and local not-for-profit, engineering and water resource experts.  The BCCC’s quarterly meetings provide stakeholders with the opportunity to share information about relevant activities happening within the watershed and to educate stakeholders about the data and information being developed as a part of the Feasibility Study.  The group effectively acts as a steering committee for the work being completed as part of the Feasibility Study.

In 2015, the quarterly meetings of the Brush Creek Coordinating Committee will be held:

Tuesday, February 3;
Tuesday, May 5;
Tuesday, August 4; and
Tuesday, November 3,

8:30 to 10:00 a.m. at the Anita B. Gorman Conservation Discovery Center, 4750 Troost Avenue, Kansas City, MO.

Action Teams

The Brush Creek Coordinating Committee formed four Action teams in 2010 to work on specific areas of interest related to the Feasibility Study and the larger goal of integrated watershed planning for the Brush Creek Basin.  After meeting regularly to establish baselines for their work, the Action Teams meet on an as-needed basis.

  • Communications/Community Engagement Action Team:  Spearheads public outreach and engagement, establishes communications messages and strategy.
  • Project Development Action Team: Supports project design and collaborates with Communications/Community Engagement Action Team is designing community input opportunities.
  • Watershed Management Action Team:  Leads the development of the Brush Creek Watershed Management Plan.
  • Environmental Action Team (E-Team):   Worked with the Corps on development of a habitat restoration model to use in evaluating the economic benefit of potential water quality projects.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

This multi-purpose project includes a wide array of ecosystem restoration measures along Brush Creek in the vicinity of Bruce R. Watkins Drive, buy cialis remedy along with compatible flood risk management, thumb recreation considerations, see and water quality improvements. In particular, the hydraulic conditions at the southbound exit ramp bridge will be evaluated to identify flood mitigation related opportunities that may be combined with nearby ecosystem restoration and compatible recreational improvements (e.g. trail connections).

 

LOCATION AND EXTENTS

The project is located along Brush Creek in the vicinity of Bruce R. Watkins Drive in Kansas City, Missouri. It begins between Bruce R. Watkins drive and Prospect Avenue and extends upstream to Woodland Avenue, a stream length of about 2100 feet. Most activities would be located between Swope Parkway and Emanuel Cleaver II Boulevard.

 

BENEFITS TO THE BRUSH CREEK WATERSHED

Habitat:  This ecosystem restoration project would restore aquatic and terrestrial habitat along Brush Creek and support a more diverse variety of species than under existing conditions.

Flood Risk Management:  Management measures could provide increased hydraulic capacity underneath the bridge structures and along the floodplain, landforms to reduce flood extents, and reduce roadway flooding and bridge overtopping frequencies. Additional outcomes would include reducing the potential loss of life, as well as reducing flood damages.

Water Quality:  Ecosystem restoration activities would inherently improve water quality conditions through management measures such as bank stabilization to reduce sedimentation, aquatic/native vegetation, stormwater BMPs, filter strips, bioretention cells, and constructed wetlands.

 

POTENTIAL FEATURES AND/OR ACTIVITIES

  • Channel and floodplain capacity improvements
  • Overflow channels/chutes
  • In-stream habitat structures
  • Bioengineered streambank stabilization
  • Rock riffle/pool complexes
  • Floodplain benches and floodplain connectivity
  • Stormwater outfall treatments
  • Woodland restoration/Prairie restoration
  • Trail connections
  • Stream buffers and filter strips
  • Bioretention cells and constructed wetlands

The Brush Creek Watershed is 29 square miles located in two states, best viagra click two counties, buy viagra and twelve cities, there encompassing many business and shopping areas as well as cultural and recreational amenities and the homes of almost half a million residents.  It is the most visible stream in the heart of our community.  Flash floods in the Brush Creek Watershed sometimes present a hazard to citizens, visitors and businesses.   Urbanization has reduced ecosystem integrity and diversity in the watershed and has resulted in degraded water quality.  Hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent on Brush Creek, but the lack of a comprehensive approach for the watershed has limited its potential as a community asset and the effectiveness of all the money that has been spent.

To optimize resources and effectiveness, interested community stakeholders that include Kansas City, Missouri and Johnson County, Kansas, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Brush Creek Coordinating Committee are working on the Brush Creek Basin Feasibility Study to examine conditions along Brush Creek.  This will lead to development of an integrated watershed management plan to improve flood risk management and water quality while balancing economic, environmental and social benefits.  The study will also identify projects that can be implemented by the local communities as soon as possible.